• Our mission is to preserve parks and create park stewards for tomorrow. Since 1983, we have completed more than 100 park projects benefiting 49 national park units and other public lands in 33 states. Furthermore, to foster future park enthusiasts and stewards, we launched in 2009 our Buddy Bison school program and in 2011 Kids to Parks Day, our nationwide day of play. Watch this video to learn more about our work and the impact of your support.

    Mapping our progress

    2014 ANNUAL REPORT

  • Since 1983, NPT has supported and assisted in acquiring inholdings and in developing public and private partnerships to promote the acquisition and preservation of parks, wildlife refuges, historic landmarks, public lands, and water ways. We have completed more than 100 park projects benefiting 49 national park units and other public lands in 33 states. To learn more about about our work and how you can get involved, contact Dick Ring, NPT Park Projects Director.  

  • Buddy Bison School Program: Because Kids Need Parks and Parks Need Kids

    The Buddy Bison school program was created in 2009 to engage diverse children from Title I schools with their local, state and national parks to teach environmental education and the numerous benefits of outdoor recreation. If parks are to survive, the face of those parks must change and under-served communities must have access to these local cultural and environmental resources.   More than 80% of the students in the Buddy Bison school program qualify for free or reduced-priced lunch, predominantly in inner city communities.  This program has been used in 60 schools across the country in grades pre-K through 8th in public, public charter and private schools across the country (20 states and Washington D.C.).  

    This experiential learning program enhances existing school curricula throughout the year with emphasis on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) as well as history, language arts, reading, geography, the arts, and outdoor recreation. Students also learn about the careers of professionals who support our parks-- and the importance of stewarding our public lands. And in addition to bringing kids to parks, we bring parks to kids by arranging schools visits from our many conservation partners.

    To learn more about how you can get involved, contact Billy Schrack, NPT Education Director.




protecting envLast month, NPT was the recipient of a grant from Union Pacific Railroad thanks to the efforts of Ann Gentle, senior manager of automotive operations. Ann was selected among the company's 45,000 employees as a finalist in their annual Chairman's Environmental Award, which was established to recognize a Union Pacific employee demonstrating outstanding environmental awareness, leadership and responsibility.

After careful research, Ann selected NPT to receive the grant for our work to connect kids to the outdoors and also for our top A- ranking with Charity Watch - a nationally prominent charity rating and evaluation service that helps donors make informed giving decisions.

Ann's passion for the outdoors developed as a young child backpacking with her family. Ann has shared her passion for the outdoors with her three children who all enjoy camping and hiking. In fact, they are all "highpointers", hiking to the highest point in each state they visit - 26 so far! However, Ann refers to her group as the "slowpointers", given that half of their hikes involved a small child in a backpack carrier or negotiating with a slightly older one to "just take 10 more steps."

"The National Park System is one of our country's greatest resources. We are blessed with acre upon acre of incredible natural beauty. After a few days with the cell phones and alarm clocks and electronic games turned off, we turn into a family of upturned faces, seeing the flora and fauna around us as if everything is new and there just for us. When you see your five-year-old squeal over the discovery of a frog hidden under a leaf in the Smoky Mountains, or listen to the teenager, who has memorized all the different types of cactus in Big Bend and delights in describing the details ('that's leguchilla, also known as the "shin-ripper"'), you fall in love with your children - and this country - all over again. Spending time in nature returns us to ourselves," stated Ann.

The gift will be used to support NPT's Kids to Parks Day National Scholarship program and will enable under-served children to explore local, state or national parks in their community. Thank you Ann for your help to preserve parks today and create park stewards for tomorrow!