• Our mission is to preserve parks and create park stewards for tomorrow. Since 1983, we have completed more than 100 park projects benefiting 49 national park units and other public lands in 33 states. Furthermore, to foster future park enthusiasts and stewards, we launched in 2009 our Buddy Bison school program and in 2011 Kids to Parks Day, our nationwide day of play. Watch this video to learn more about our work and the impact of your support.

    Mapping our progress

    2013 ANNUAL REPORT

  • Since 1983, NPT has supported and assisted in acquiring inholdings and in developing public and private partnerships to promote the acquisition and preservation of parks, wildlife refuges, historic landmarks, public lands, and water ways. We have completed more than 100 park projects benefiting 49 national park units and other public lands in 33 states. To learn more about about our work and how you can get involved, contact Dick Ring, NPT Park Projects Director.  

  • Buddy Bison School Program: Because Kids Need Parks and Parks Need Kids

    The Buddy Bison school program was created in 2009 to engage diverse children from Title I schools with their local, state and national parks to teach environmental education and the numerous benefits of outdoor recreation. If parks are to survive, the face of those parks must change and under-served communities must have access to these local cultural and environmental resources.   More than 80% of the students in the Buddy Bison school program qualify for free or reduced-priced lunch, predominantly in inner city communities.  This program has been used in 60 schools across the country in grades pre-K through 8th in public, public charter and private schools across the country (20 states and Washington D.C.).  

    This experiential learning program enhances existing school curricula throughout the year with emphasis on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) as well as history, language arts, reading, geography, the arts, and outdoor recreation. Students also learn about the careers of professionals who support our parks-- and the importance of stewarding our public lands. And in addition to bringing kids to parks, we bring parks to kids by arranging schools visits from our many conservation partners.

    To learn more about how you can get involved, contact Billy Schrack, NPT Education Director.




school03"The Flint Hills of Kansas are our ocean, our mountains, our mecca. . . You'll probably get lost on the unmarked, unpaved roads but allow yourself this adventure through rolling and endless ranchland dotted by countless wildflowers and exquisite prairie grasses anchored by the impressive big bluestem." - National Geographic

PRESS RELEASE
November 2, 2001

Washington D.C. - In National Geographic's Traveler's October 2001 Special Collector's Issue, National Geographic listed the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve as one of the top places in America to visit.

The Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve (Preserve) is a 10,894-acre remnant of tallgrass prairie located in the heart of the Kansas Flint Hills. The Preserve is the only national park unit dedicated to preserving a rare remnant of the vast expanse of tallgrass prairie that once covered much of the central portion of North America.

Visitors to the Preserve can enjoy the experience of touring the historic Spring Hill Ranch headquarters. The 11-room house was built with hand cut native limestone, characteristic of the Second Empire style of 19th Century architecture. The Preserve also boasts a massive three-story barn and the Lower Fox Creek School, a one-room schoolhouse located on a nearby hilltop. The Preserve has a 1.75-mile nature trail, which presents marvelous vistas as well as an opportunity for a detailed look at the prairie ecosystem. Visitors can tour the vast rolling Flint Hills, once the hunting grounds of the Kansa and Osage Indians. In addition to the bookstore, the National Park Trust has recently expanded its resource center to help educate visitors on this important part of America's history.

National Geographic says, "The Flint Hills of Kansas are our ocean, our mountains, our mecca. . . You'll probably get lost on the unmarked, unpaved roads but allow yourself this adventure through rolling and endless ranchland dotted by countless wildflowers and exquisite prairie grasses anchored by the impressive big bluestem." The article also points out that nearby Cottonwood Falls is the best place in the state to get a steak and stay in an elite bed-and-breakfast. "We've always known that the Preserve was one of the unique hidden treasures of America," says Paul C. Pritchard, President of National Park Trust, "but we are honored by this tremendous commendation from National Geographic."

The historic Spring Hill Ranch was purchased by the National Park Trust in 1994 and was renamed the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve when it became a unit of the National Park System in 1996. This park unit is unique for several reasons one of them being that it is the only park unit authorized by Congress, on such a large scale, to be privately owned. In a first of its kind private/public partnership, the National Park Trust, a private nonprofit land conservancy, will retain ownership of all but 180 acres of the land that comprises the Preserve. However, the National Park Service is authorized to manage the entire 10,894-acre Preserve through a cooperative agreement with the Trust.

The National Park Trust is the only land conservancy uniquely dedicated to preserving America's national system of parks, wildlife refuges, and historical monuments. For more information on how you can visit the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, call (620) 273-8494 or visit our web site at www.parktrust.org.

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The entrance to Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve is located two miles north of Strong City, Kansas on State Highway 177. For bus tour reservations and additional information, please call (620) 273-8494.

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For more information, contact:
Louise Carlin
Project Coordinator (PERC)
National Park Trust (NPT)
620-273-8139
louise@parktrust.org

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Founded in 1983, National Park Trust is the only land conservancy dedicated to preserving our national system of parks, wildlife and historic monuments.